The Wikipedia ban thing

According to the BBC report it was a single reader who started the whole chain of events. Were they aware that the record has been around for decades and was once freely available in UK high streets?

One would imagine that a body like the Internet Watch Foundation would have some understanding of how the Internet works. Do they not realise that anyone can Google for the image if they want to see it and that, as Wikipedia may be copied freely, you can find the Wikipedia article elsewhere anyway? The text from the article is available on a mobile phone version – without the image but updated to include information on the censorship.

Meanwhile we are left with the even more disturbing image….

small_wikierror.jpg

Update: 10th December 2008

IWF backdown

“…in light of the length of time the image has existed and its wide availability, the decision has been taken to remove this webpage from our list.”

笠置シヅ子 東京ブギウギ

The joys of the Interweb continue to delight… So you grab a copy of the BBC Radio Widget thingy and replace Real Player 11 with version 10 as the newer version will not play when you leave the Dashboard. Then you can listen to Late Junction, which being an early shift working kind of guy I do not usually get to hear, and discover the wonderful Tokyo Boogie-Woogie from the CD The Rough Guide to the Music of Japan. Wikipedia tells us a little but YouTube reveals all…

and Babel Fish assures me that the title refers to the young Shizuko Kasagi and her Tokyo bugi ugi.

The Amazing Bouncing Spam

spamcount.jpg

At 6:30 on Thursday (17/04/08) evening about 10 bounced spam emails arrived – someone having used my domain to send their spam. I had had a flurry of similar activity last year but that soon dried up. Over the next couple of days the number would edge towards 4500. On Friday 200 an hour were arriving.

Alarmingly some were “Out Of Office” auto-responses. I assume if anyone actually replied to the thing it would come back to me but replying to spam is never a good idea.

Several used some form of filtering service like Sendo or MailMarshal.

Most had the body of the message removed but from the few that had it intact it was apparently a link to bonmerfiket.net or Legal RX Medications as they like to be known. They have a splendid Anti Spam policy but you would not want to type your details into their form nor enter any financial details into their online order form – even though they claim years of experience, which is really impressive, but probably not too many customers in their early days.

Samuel Stimms seems to be somewhat elusive but if he actually existed he is probably related to Alex Polyakov who is usually high on the Spamhaus most wanted list.

If only everybody used a Mac we could be spared such things 😉